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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 7:29 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:28 pm
Posts: 1292
Location: East Fife.
Car Models: SAAB 96/MGB/Classic Twingo/Niss Figaro
I recently decided to drop the rear axle out do a major refurbishment of all the back axle components, and the axle tunnel. This would normally be a winter job, though not very comfortable working in a difficult to heat garage, in the winter.
I would normally not want to do this sort of major job in the summer, because every other week, there’s another car show to go to, but this year? Na, obviously not, so it seemed a good idea to do this now, in the warm!!

I have one of those CJ Auto car lifting devices, as a well as a HUGE Truck Trolley jack. This made the job a lot easier. The Lifting Device allows you to find the balance point of the car, when it’s up, and so it’s really easy to tip the nose up and down, as required. The HUGE trolley jack works as a back up support, for safety.

The axle tunnel itself had no major issues. Some corrosion was starting where the underseal had started to peel, but nothing serious
I good clean up with a knotted wheel on the grinder, Bilt Hamber rust remover (Twice), followed by a coat of Rust Beater Mastic 121 two part epoxy on the bare, treated, metal, followed by 2 coats of POR 15 brush on, with a coat of POR 15 from a spray can on top of that. Then Bilt Hamber wax. This is the formula I use all over the car when treating the body.

I also removed the petrol tank, because there was some welding needing done in the back corners of the tank recess. Cleaned out the tank, (No sediment at all), and inspected the inside with an endoscope, and found it to be clean as a whistle.
The outside of the tank itself, had a wee bit of surface rust on it, but nothing at all serious.

The back axle itself was quite rusty, but came up nicely after a couple of applications of Bilt Hamber rust remover. Same story the trailing arms, and brake back plates. All treated as above.

Replaced the rear wheel cylinders, short copper brake pipes, and flexibles up to the rear of the body. Flexibles are Black Diamond, braided hoses. Obviously changed the brake fluid. Used the EZ system, and the brakes were bled in 20 minutes. This was helped by being able to have the car nose up, to bleed the front brakes, and rear up, to bleed the rear brakes.

I also replaced the axle centre bushing, and all the trailing arm bushes. (Poly flex). Getting the old centre bush out was a bit of a mission. I tried to draw it out first, with a homemade device that included a 48 mm socket, bought for the occasion, but this didn’t work, so just drilled out the rubber, and then split the steel ring that was left. The new one went in nicely with a long bolt, and an appropriately sized socket.
Finally, because the handbrake has been very hard to adjust enough to really lock the wheels, I "modified" the actuating arms.
I read on the forum that Mini hand brake operating arms are the same dimensions as the SAAB arms. They are, excpet that the actual arm that the cable pulls on, is shorter.
I "modified" the hand brake levers, to get more purchase so to say. It seemed to me that when the hand brake was full on. it was past the 90 degrees, in terms of the angle between the arm, and the cables, when full on. Once the arm is past 90 degrees, it's not really effectively applying much more pressure. Also, the cables, although new, were nearly out of adjustment. To try and fix this I heated the arms, and forced them back to try and get more purchase. Whether this has made any difference, remains to be seen, but the adjusters between the seats, now have plenty adjustment left, with the cables tight, and seemingly locking the wheels on the third click.


Some photos below.

Rear end up!

ImageIMG_0341

The block of wood (Both sides), along with the huge trolley jack, were the "belts and braces" for safety.
Image
Axle and other components out.
Image

Image

All cleaned up.

Image

Trying to get that pesky axle centre bush out. Had to destroy it to get it out, in the end!

Image

Brakes assembled.

Image

Bleed the front brakes

Image

Bleed the back brakes

Image

"Modified" hand brake arm. (Top)
The upper one is in fact for a Mini. It's dimensions are almost the same as the SAAB, except the length of the operating arm.
In the end I "modified" the lower SAAB arm, by heating, and bending it back in the same way. These are what're fitted to the car now.

Image


Last edited by The Troll on Tue Sep 15, 2020 7:40 pm, edited 6 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 7:53 am 
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Joined: Mon May 17, 2004 8:34 am
Posts: 3802
Location: West Dorset UK
Car Models: 96TT/900S Cabrio/9-3SW Aero
Nice job, Andy. Everything will be a lot better for the good clean-up and re-treatment with good stuff. I use a lot of Bilt-Hamber products and find that they do the job well. Rear axle centre bushes are always a "fun" job - I've done a few. Mostly with a home-made tool, the first one was cut out (as you did!) and, for the last one, I borrowed the proper Saab tool from john-saab - that made it so easy. It's great having him so near - just a few miles away - with his knowledge of the 96 and 95 plus a fair few "proper" tools. I always appreciate his help.
Good luck with the rest of the task - your car is a beauty and well worth preserving for the long term. My 96 is in fairly good shape - hasn't been used much but starts and runs first time, every time - and is filled with V-Power to preserve its innards. My current efforts are being spent on the Opel GT - sorting out the headlights (wrong-dip sealed beam units found fitted on purchase - it's only been in the UK for 40 years!) and the wiring nightmare, where there's been some major bodgery to convert it from US-spec to UK-spec lighting. Plus fitting Pertronix Ignitor II electronic ignition and Flamethrower coil - they're the easy bit!

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David.
1969 Opel GT (under restoration)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 8:12 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:28 pm
Posts: 1292
Location: East Fife.
Car Models: SAAB 96/MGB/Classic Twingo/Niss Figaro
David
Thanks for the comments.

How on earth could the Opel pass an MOT, if the lights are dipping the wrong way? Did it have tape on the headlights?

Things have tightened up in the last few years, in terms of importing cars.

I imported a Renault Twingo from France in 2001, and during the registration process nobody asked anything about the headlights, or what units the speedo showed. I drove that car for 7 years, with black tape on the headlights, and a digital speedo in Km/hr only.

When I imported the one we have now, in 2008, the DVLA would not let me register it, till I had documentary proof that the lights had been changed for left dipping lights, and that the speedo showed MPH, not Km/hr.

Andy


Last edited by The Troll on Mon Aug 31, 2020 4:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 8:16 am 
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Full Pressure Turbo
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Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2008 4:07 pm
Posts: 889
Location: Kent
Car Models: Bullnose
Well done Andy...Great job. Really brightened up my early Monday morning reading. Love the coffee mug, at least we chaps know our place in life...(drinking) :lol: The V4 is in safe hands. How do you wind up the lifting system and tilt it? Do you just jack the car up and lock the frame into place? Impressive.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 4:32 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:28 pm
Posts: 1292
Location: East Fife.
Car Models: SAAB 96/MGB/Classic Twingo/Niss Figaro
Lovegrace

The device is wound up down using an electric drill. Not any old Black and Decker though. When I first got the device I tried to use my "ordinary" Black and Decker. Nae chance. I ended up having to buy a big heavy duty Macallister drill. Big Bertha I call her.
Works a treat.
The Lifter goes flat, slide it under the car, (it is quite heavy, but perfectly doable on your own).
Make sure it's in the right place in terms of where it's going to apply the lifting force. ie on the inner edges of the sills.
Drill in, wheeeeeeeee up she goes. If you place it carefully, the car can be perfectly balanced, and can be tipped front end up or down, with a little push of the hand.
I use the giant truck trolley jack as safety, if crawilng about underneath.
It's obviously not as good as a 2 post lift, but it gives pretty good, under car, access.

As for the tea mug, aye weel. as we say up here, these are the realities of married life. Dae as yir telt!! (Do as your told), and life is sweet.
The story above about the Twingo, is all because SWMBO "wanted one". "But darling, Renault never sold them here" says I.
"Well go back to France and buy one then" She says.
So I did what I was telt!
We're on our 2nd one now.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 5:29 pm 
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Full Pressure Turbo
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Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2008 4:07 pm
Posts: 889
Location: Kent
Car Models: Bullnose
The Troll wrote:

As for the tea mug, aye weel. as we say up here, these are the realities of married life. Dae as yir telt!! (Do as your told), and life is sweet.
The story above about the Twingo, is all because SWMBO "wanted one". "But darling, Renault never sold them here" says I.
"Well go back to France and buy one then" She says.
So I did what I was telt!


He..he.. Thats made me smile. Well done Andy, keep up the good work and go safe.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 8:20 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2014 9:51 pm
Posts: 1447
Location: Edinburgh
Car Models: 9-5 2.3t Arc Estate
I see you're making good use of your time there Andy.

I like your jacking device, that will be useful for a great majority of the jobs you need to do keeping these old Saabs roadworthy. Who makes them? It might be a worthwhile substitute for the longed for two poster I most likely will never have.

Stewart

Sorry, just read with more care and I see it is CJ Autos. Thanks.

_________________
9-5 2.3t Arc estate
9-3 SE convertible
9000 2.3 CDi S
9-5 2.0t Airflow
XJ6
9-5 Aero
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 10:29 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:28 pm
Posts: 1292
Location: East Fife.
Car Models: SAAB 96/MGB/Classic Twingo/Niss Figaro
Aye aye Stewart.
It's a bit of a guddle to get it under the car.

Before I got new front springs, I had to jack the side where the exhaust runs, a little, to get it past the exhaust, but since fitting new front springs, she's sitting higher, and I don't need to do this any more. So much easier.
You'll see in the photos that I've got wood under the place where the hard plastic wheels run.
Without them, it really marks the garage floor.
Note also the bit about needing a seriously powerful electric drill to operate it. There is a manual winding handle, but I've never tried that. A young, strong man might manage, but an older Codger like me? Na....

I got it at a "special price" at the NEC a few years ago. (though can't remember how much now....somewhere around £300 and £400 I think.).
Once the car is up, it's really easy to work on the underside.

Update:- Just looked at their website, it's £780 now!!! Wow...

Andy


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2020 10:04 am 
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Joined: Mon May 17, 2004 8:34 am
Posts: 3802
Location: West Dorset UK
Car Models: 96TT/900S Cabrio/9-3SW Aero
The Troll wrote:
How on earth could the Opel pass an MOT, if the lights are dipping the wrong way? Did it have tape on the headlights

Yes, it had the round stickers applied at the last MoT - the day before I bought it! It hadn't done many miles since its major (expensive) restoration about 8 years ago so I assume it was rarely driven at night. How the MoT testers missed it, we'll never know (but I know who they are as I have the certificates!). Something for all "importers" of LHD cars from the States or Europe to watch out for. Replacement units aren't expensive. At least I have a set of RH-dip units that I can swap in/out at Dover!

Note re refurbishment of the back axle: i too took the brake backplates off, then made up a "bath" to hold the complete axle, from heavy-duty plastic sheet and a wooden frame, and immersed the whole thing in a Bilt-Hamber water-based rust remover solution. Left it for a few days (24hrs is the recommended time), during which time the solution got into the axle's innards through the backplate bolt holes, so the insides were de-rusted as well! Rinsed it all off and painted it with Rustbusters 2-pack epoxy black stuff. It's lasted well.

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David.
1969 Opel GT (under restoration)


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2020 3:43 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:28 pm
Posts: 1292
Location: East Fife.
Car Models: SAAB 96/MGB/Classic Twingo/Niss Figaro
David
As I said earlier, we drove that 1st Twingo for 7 years, with tape on the headlights, and it passed every MOT.
The speedo is apparently not part of an MOT. so the km/hr only speedo was never an issue.
(Glad of that because my current 96 has a km/hr only speedo, and has had since Gary Robert Crawford imported it in 1985.

Importing the 2nd Twingo in 2008 was a whole new ball game. No way to register it without fitting a digital speedo convertor, and left dipping lights.
The first generation Twingo (1993 to 2007), was never made right hand drive, for driving on the left side of the road, but it WAS sold in Japan, (where they drive on the left, like we do).
The reason behind why Renault sold the car in Japan, with the steering wheel on the wrong side, is, as they say, a long story.
Anyway, that's the only reason that left dipping headlights were even available for the mark 1 Twingo.
They're pretty unique to the car, so I might have struggled to find equivalents, had Renault not decide to try and sell the car in Japan.

Andy


Last edited by The Troll on Fri Sep 04, 2020 10:21 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2020 7:12 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2007 9:47 am
Posts: 3384
Location: Aberdeen,UK
Car Models: 96 V4, 99, C900, C900 Vert
Just catching up.

Great work Andy.
I like your see saw gizmo. Very handy.

_________________
96 V4 1968
99 GL 2 Dr 1984
C900 2 Dr 1987
C900S LPT Vert 1993

"We are one, we are SAAB"


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2020 10:03 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:28 pm
Posts: 1292
Location: East Fife.
Car Models: SAAB 96/MGB/Classic Twingo/Niss Figaro
Aye, aye Jim. Hoos yir doos?
Aye, the "See Saw" lifter is great.

Finished the car today, petrol in tank, a few winds to get petrol up to the carb, and off she went.
Wash and scrub, ready for the Torque Show on the 20th.

Feels like I might have to bleed the brakes again though.
Though I had a solid pedal, last week, when I bled the brakes, it went halfway down today (1st time I've touched the brake pedal since bleeding them), with the 1st press, but then went solid again.

Update, 14th Sep. Having now driven the car for a few days, the brakes are absolutely fine. Very much better than before.


Last edited by The Troll on Mon Sep 14, 2020 7:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2020 1:44 pm 
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Posts: 1292
Location: East Fife.
Car Models: SAAB 96/MGB/Classic Twingo/Niss Figaro
My door cards were getting decidely ropy, so I decided to have a go at making some new ones, using hard board material I bought localy, and vynil from a company called Martrim ( https://martrim.co.uk/car-trimming-supp ... r-trim.php).
Around £26 (of which postage is nearly half!) for enough vynil to do 2 door. Basically a 1 metre length, width 1.4 metres.

First of all, after using the old door card as a template, and cutting the hardboard to size, I treated it with Sikkens, wood preserver. This is the stuff I treated my new garage with a number of years back. It's not cheap, but very good. All this so that if the plastic back sheeting I fitted, should allow some moisture in, the hardboard would perhaps not immediately turn to dust.

Cut round the vynil,then using evostick contact adhesive, stuck the vynil onto the board. The again using evostick, stuck plastic sheeting on the back. I prefer this approach to sticking the plastic to the door, which just creates access problems later, when you want to get into the back of the door.
I made a small booboo around the plastic surround of the door realease handle, on the drivers door, and I could have made a better job of getting the air out at one or two small places, on the passenger door, but it looks a guzzillion times better than the old stuff.
I might even have another go, and try and do a better job.
Some photos.

Bare board cut to size.
Image

Treated with Sikkens

Image

Front - annoying bubbles, where I wasn't hard enough with the squeegee.
Image

Plastic on the rear.
Image

On the car
Image

Also made new boards for the boot. 3.5 mm Plywood.
Image


Last edited by The Troll on Sat Sep 19, 2020 8:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2020 8:20 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 26, 2014 9:41 am
Posts: 5039
Location: Royal Tunbridge Wells
Car Models: '03 9-5 2.3 Vector Auto Estate Noob Stg 1, Suzuki S Cross, '81 TR7 DHC
I thought the idea of sticking the plastic membrane to the door frame was to stop any water which gets past the window seals getting into the car and ensuring it drained through the bottom of the door? Do you think you might have a problem of water in the footwells if you do not replicate the membrane on the door?

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Alan

'03 9-5 2.3t Vector Estate Auto Noob Stg 1
'01 9-3 2.0t SE Vert Auto
'81 Triumph TR7 DHC


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2020 8:26 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:28 pm
Posts: 1292
Location: East Fife.
Car Models: SAAB 96/MGB/Classic Twingo/Niss Figaro
TWSaab
My car has never had any sort of plastic membrane on the door, since I bought it 7 years ago, and have had no problem with water ingression, into the car by that route. The bottom of the door is well waxed, with clear, large drain holes.
So, not really worrying about it.

Andy


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 14, 2020 2:16 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 20, 2007 6:33 pm
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Location: NETTLEHAM, LINCOLNSHIRE
Car Models: 1981 99 Turbo & 1979 C900 GLS + Jaguar XF 250 S/brake & FIAT 500 TwinAir
Andy,

I have merged your recent posts so they are all in the one thread as per the big orange box at the head of this page..

Quote:
Forum rules

The place for you to start a thread about and show us your car.

(Please stick to one thread, rather than starting several threads for the same vehicle).

Your Cars is the place for telling us about your new cars, minor upgrades and mini projects.
Full on restorations & major rebuilds should be posted in Restorations & Major Projects.


Nice work by the way.

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When you think you know it all, it's a sure sign you don't.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 14, 2020 6:23 pm 
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Location: East Fife.
Car Models: SAAB 96/MGB/Classic Twingo/Niss Figaro
Sorry Mal, thanks for merging my 2 threads.

Andy


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