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PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 10:35 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2006 10:32 pm
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Location: Glenrothes, Fife
Car Models: 95, 99, 900, 9000, 93, Sonett
Great to see an OG93 getting some love and attention, superb work, but also shows how well these cars can hide rust...! I'm slightly nervous about looking too closely at mine now, it's had the bulkhead welding done prior to my owning it, but the area is looking slightly brown now. The back arches are starting to look scabby, but it's had the spare wheel well & floorpans attended to in the last couple of years. It's a high mileage workhorse, but when her working days are done I'm hoping to give her a sympathetic cosmetic overhaul. Superb work on yours, look forward to seeing further updates.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2019 9:54 am 
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Car Models: Volvo 240 B200F
Wow!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2019 12:43 pm 
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Location: Ingleby barwick, cleveland
Car Models: 2000 9-3 viggen convertible.
Your doing a good job. Has that car lived on a seafront?

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 11:59 pm 
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Car Models: 9-3 OG
7aero, Bricktop, Doive, mentepazza, Geoff 9-3 thanks for the comments, good to see some love for the OG's out there.

Quote:
You’re doing a good job. Has that car lived on a seafront?


It's spent most of its life in Southampton but I think the OG's are starting to show their age a bit now. Looking at Rot others have found I think I've got off lightly with the exception of the Bulkhead. I was genuinely gutted when I was going to scrap it and in the end just couldn't do it and had to continue.

Time for a long overdue update on project silver. Bring on more pictures...

Stripped the engine bay out fully to access all the minor surface rust areas prior to painting.
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Cleaned up areas like the passenger chassis leg that had minor surface rust. It had an unused thread that was removed along with the old bulkhead insulation retaining points on the firewall.
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Did my usual sanding back then treating with Deox gel. Would've loved to get this front end blasted and painted professionally but logistically and financially I couldn't make that work. Instead I've used a mixture of primers like epoxy or rust encapsulator that were brush painted then flatted back for rust areas.
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Next job was to seam seal the repair areas in the engine bay. I decided to buy some proper 3M brush able seam sealant thinking this would be better than using tiger seal. I will let the picture do the talking on this one, I even used the proper brush!

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Yep what a mess and after a week or so only the 1 or 2mm thickness areas had cured. I had to bite the bullet on this and accept that it's not really suitable for the deeper coverage I needed and rake it all out again. Attempt two with the trusty Tigerseal looked much better in all areas.
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This was the plate that was removed for rust repair at the top of the arch with some nice new seam sealer. Few other areas got some new seam sealer where required.
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I was excited to reach the paint stage and much prep work later it was finally ready. The epoxy primer while brilliant was a real nightmare to feather the edges and clearly more suited to a complete covering application. I ended up flatting a lot back and requiring some standard etch where I rubbed though the e-coat. As I was painting the day after prep though this worked out okay moisture wise. Didn't want surrounding cars getting covered in overspray so went crazy with the plastic. This worked a treat and acted as a wind break for any light breeze.
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Armed and dangerous I decided to use the adhesion promotor on everything. Had intended to use it on areas like under brackets but did everything for a belt a braces approach especially on areas with seam sealer.

Engine bay in primer
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Colour and lacquer applied
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Pleased with this for a 1k aerosol job it's tidied up the engine bay nicely.

Scuttle panel area was next on the list. I'd previously re-done the seam sealer on the drivers side as my initial attempt was too high allowing water to spill out the brake servo access bungs. I dealt with any surface rust and then brush epoxy primed the entire scuttle to give it some protection from all the moisture it's subjected to. It won't be seen so I didn't go mad flatting it back to make sure it had full coverage.

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With the bay and scuttle painted it no longer looked like a scrap car.
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The seam sealer in the windscreen corners had cracked so sections were re-done and painted.
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Even though the internal bulkhead repair won't be seen I couldn't resist giving it the full rust encapsulator primer, seam sealer and paint process.
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Next job was the crossmember and more exposed chassis areas. Took care of any surface rust and went with 2 coats of Buzzweld rust encapsulator on those areas.
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Added some seam sealer to that vulnerable seam then two coats of Buzzweld chassis in one. These front end areas are hidden but subject to a fair bit of wet weather so wanted some good paint coverage.
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I've continued this on the underside of the chassis legs to give a bit more protection. These areas are normally just e-coat, they didn't even get top coat from factory and shows that e-coat is hard wearing. Asking a lot of it after 20 years though so belt and braces approach here.
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Wheel arches were next. I was debating whether or not to remove the small amount of seam sealer that remained and glad I did.
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All surface rust but the inner arches were taken back to clean metal and got various treatments. One arch got a really tough Buzzweld 2k epoxy armour as an experiment with the other getting the tried and tested Rust encapuslator followed by Chassis in one. The 2k armour was impressive for hidden areas like this but requires a rougher surface and direct to metal. The brush also starts to clog up with the limited pot life and the temperature outside had started to get right on the limit for epoxy. That was followed by some tiger seal for seam sealer.
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Scotched and light sanded depending on coating then the upol gravi gaurd went on.
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Finally another two coats of Chassis in One.
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The font end was now painted and time for some long awaited re-assembly. That re-assembly lasted about 10mins with the bonnet release cable then realised I needed a part from the donor black saab. The bulkhead plate from project silver was looking worse for wear, especially the seal with all that water leaking though it.
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The bulkhead plate in the black donor saab looked great but this presented a challenge. I wanted the black saab to act as a reference for re-assembly and where all the wires are routed and clipped. Removing the bulkhead plate would need some major disassembly but as I didn't need the looms I could cut them and leave them attached.
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Made a right school boy error with the labels on the silver saab which faded. This time I used marker on the masking tape and took plenty of photos along the way. Interior support that would be used as a reference later.
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Mission complete, the bulkhead plate on this 70K donor is in much better shape. The foam seal is 20 years old so it will get a small bead of black tigerseal just to make sure it's watertight. Shouldn't see any water really now the scuttle joint is fixed but better safe than sorry.
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I then went off on a bit of a tangent and wanted to prepare the heater box for re-assembly. The one in the silver saab was tried and tested but I wanted to make sure it was clean internally especially the evaporator and condensation hole. Would be gutting to reassemble the car and find the air con stinks, that's my excuse anyway.

Before
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During
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This was the you've gone to far regret moment. Can't remember why I took this bit apart think a bit accidently fell out but worked it all out eventually.
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Cleaned, greased and robbed the heater resistor and seal from the black saab. I still need to order and change the seals on the heater matrix but this can be done in the car.
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Only bit left was the top seals that mate with the dashboard top vents. On both cars the part looked in a similar state.
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Used some suitably sized draught excluder that will compress and seal once the dashboard and vent ducts are resting on it.
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With that mini project out of the way it was time to face the music and the sad looking inside of the silver saab. When I thought I was scrapping the car I removed the looms with little regard for all the plastics or position. Thankfully I didn't cut any wires but it was going to require a boat load of patience and bits from the donor to get things back to factory wiring routing.
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I had a tidy up and retrieved this grubby engine bay loom that feeds into the passenger side grommet hole.
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Cleaned it up, checking it over as I went. This connection was taped up but I had a look and removed that old wire taping it up again.
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The insulation tape in sections was looking a bit tatty and had rubbed in this location. The wire had corroded so I ended up putting it quite a long repair section to remove the green you see here.
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Used Tesa 51026 tape to smarten it up and offer a bit more protection in certain areas.
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Loom fitted using black saab as a reference and adding things like abs sensors and parts like washer bottle back in.
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Some serious hours went into getting the inside ready for the dashboard again. The footwell insulation helps support the heater box so I sectioned it into three pieces. That will allow me access to all the wiring for future work and this re-assembly. Used a small bead of tigerseal on the bulkhead plate seal and where the dashboard support structure bolts into the scuttle panel. You would have to be parked on a hill for those bolts to see any water but you never know so they are now water tight. Used Tesa 51618 tape putting all the loom back into the plastic channels on the drivers side. The donor car really paid for itself for the bits an pieces of plastic that were required for the wiring and to act as a reference.

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The clutch pedal assembly is a bit tricky to remove so while the dashboard was out I replaced the master cylinder for peace of mind.
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Dashboard back in place and looking so much better with a carbon effect dash surround. I have some small areas of floor to fix but needed all this back in. I had parts everywhere and this frees up some room for the future engine build. That rust on the passenger floor is all the grinding dust bedded in. I've cleaned the drivers side but ran out of Autogylm Magma.
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Moved back onto the engine bay but little jobs seemed to take ages. This was a great example cleaning up the fuel and evap connections which had picked up mine and a previous owners overspray (cleaned line on right). I mean nobody will see this really but I knew it was there and couldn't help myself.
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Evap connection joints had perished so I used some high grade fuel hose.
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Engine bay now coming together and looks like this.
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Next on the list is a bit of parts shopping and tackle the brake lines and steering rack. The goal is to get the front end something like then either do the rest of the car or the engine build. Still deciding on the order, pros and cons to mull over :-)


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2020 10:28 am 
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Location: South Wales
Car Models: 900 SE Stage 3
That is an impressive amount of work gone in. That's given me a few ideas for my 900. For one thing, I reckon my phantom leak that I've struggled to find may well be from the bulkhead plate. I also reckon my charcoal canister pipes must be shot as the wings have never been removed in 25 years.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2020 10:58 pm 
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Car Models: 9-3 OG
Thanks @Kei, glad it was helpful you might want to check that scuttle panel seam sealer and the two bungs that get removed to access the brake servo bolts. Waters not really meant to drop onto that bulkhead plate but if the above are letting water then you can watch it slowly drip onto that area. The seal on mine wasn't water tight and the bulkhead insulation didn't help things so it stayed quite wet back there.

Yep those little pipes were well gone on both cars. I know the silver one was showing an evap fault but not sure if these are equipped with vacuum or pressure sensors to be able to do a self check.

Just refurbishing the brake servo and master cylinder before making up some new lines. Will get some more pics up when that bits done.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 8:49 pm 
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Car Models: GM900
Bloody good work there mate.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2020 1:09 pm 
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Location: Essex - the saab wastelands
Impressive work so far. I keep thinking of getting another 9-3 Aero of this era, but the amount of rust is definitely putting me off! :shock:

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:24 pm 
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Gaznod wrote:
Impressive work so far. I keep thinking of getting another 9-3 Aero of this era, but the amount of rust is definitely putting me off! :shock:


I'd definitely like another 9-3 Coupe, but they are getting very rare now.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:59 pm 
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Car Models: 9-3 OG
Thanks for the comments @WheelyBigCheese, @Gaznod & @7aero. Don't let it put you off getting one and at least you know where to look now. There will be some good ones out there and the donor car was in much better shape with the exception of the crash damage.

Not a massive update but things are progressing so lets bring on the pics...

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The bracket for the ABS pump was just starting to rust along with a few other bits. Considering the work required to remove that in situ I thought it best to get it powder coated. They acid dipped the parts and did them in a nice satin black. Really pleased with how they turned out and was a chance to fit the battery tray in correctly this time around lol.

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Needed to overhaul the brake servo and master cylinder next and that got me thinking. I've seen people install the Viggen versions of these parts to compliment a brake upgrade but there's conflicting info about the pedal feel on that modification. I seriously looked into this and few things put me off, one was the fact I couldn't find a RHD version of the brake servo so might require a custom vacum line. The other was cost where Viggen tax seems to apply and these parts are more expensive than standard items. Instead I cleaned up servo and rebuilt the master cylinder using a rebuild kit.

Took some cleaning and treating with deox gel to get rid of the surface rust where the two sections join with pressed retainers. Nearly ready for paint in this pic.
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The master cylinder was a bit of a challenge. The rebuild kit comes with a snap ring that has holes for pliers but the original doesn't have anything to remove it with.
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Had to grind some groves with the dremel and weaken the back so I could fold it in on itself. Not enough room to get screwdrivers behind unfortunately.
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I hate brake fluid and the rebuild was messy and bit fiddly. Gloved up I stupidly didn't take photos but laid everything out carefully. This backfired on the final seal and somehow I confused myself. I then had to open up a spare to check I had everything in the right order. If anyone does anything similar consider buying new instead but here's the pictures I took for reference second time around.

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Bit of Simoniz tough black paint and clean out of the fluid reservoir and it was looking like new. Finished pic on the car coming up later...

Next job on the list was the brake lines. The fronts had rusted solid into the brake hoses so couldn't be removed without cutting when I dismantled the car. Few bits like this hiding away but not bad at all for 20 year old pipes!

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Had a bit of a Saga ordering some Cupro Nickel (kunifer) with copper turning up instead. In the end went directly to automec and bought their Kunifer which was really good quality although pricey. There's probably a few ways of shaping lines but what works for me is to tie wrap the new to old and use a socket mounted in a bench to do the bends. The random wire in the pic was used for measuring the length of the old pipe.

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This Sykes pickavant flaremaster tool makes me smile every time I use it. Perfect flare which is handy when I only had one shot to get it exactly right length.
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The brakes lines went well with the exception of one line where I noticed this defect on final check over. Small dent where the bend is, not sure if it was there originally or caused by my shaping. Had a brew and a biscuit then remade that line so I know it's all 100%.
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The full collection ready for fitting. Due to where I cut the old lines the final bend was hard to judge on the drivers brake line so left that one till they were on the car.
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Next up was the steering rack which I took from the 70k donor car as my original looked like something off the titanic. I had been debating getting it rebuilt just for piece of mind but had settled on cleaning it up and fitting it. That decision wasn't a good one, as I started cleaning it quite a bit of fluid came out the bellows where the arms attach. Sent it off to western power steering and asked them to rebuild my rack instead of sending out an exchange item. Wasn't sure if they would paint the whole thing black like other re manufactured racks but it came back like original with the main body cleaned up (presume the vapour blast it as the black paint remained).

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This won't be a show car but wanted to prevent that from surface rusting and also smarten up the black ends that needed sanding and treating.

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Bit mad doing this on a bit that won't be seen but I couldn't resist. Prepped, then bit of upol acid etch followed by hycote aluminium spray and lacquer on the body. Ends got the trusty Simoniz tough black treatment...

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Had to order in new seals which took some time as I bought loads of bits for future jobs to avoid more waiting on parts. Notice the spring from what I presume is a one way valve in this bolt had popped out.

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Could tell that wasn't right when refitting and noticed it should be retained in the base like this.

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I bought various new lines for the power steering and clutch cylinder connections with a few new stainless steel jubilee clips. The old ones were 20 years old and the fit sloppy on a few items so thought it best to renew any rubber style parts. You can't buy new rubber drivers side rack mounts so I've gone for the powerflew item for that and the Parts for Saab brace on the passenger side. Would've loved to use an Abbott brace but with so many parts to buy couldn't justify the massive price difference. The gold PFS brace is actually really good, I even did a test fit just with that mount and it's gripping the rack no worries there. Teased you long enough here it all is installed, brake lines, steering rack and Servo.

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Weather has taken turn for the worse so I've got a few things on the go at once now. Started engine dismantling but changed my mind and want to get the car something like a rolling chassis before I go any further as work space is tight. With that in mind removed the suspension legs from the donor car which are in great shape compared to the ones that came on the silver saab.

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The Bilstein b8 arrived and come with there own gland nuts. This was handy as the original gland nuts are super tight and took stilsons and a hammer to remove which chewed them up a bit.
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The B8's didn't come with a gland nut tool so I rang up Bilstein to find out which one I needed as a few sizes exist. They gave me part number 14-244148 and it's labelled MS 08/6. They don't sell direct so I picked one up from autodoc for about £15. Might save someone else a phone call if you have the gland nut labelled 'B36-816 C2'. The instructions say 130nm for the Bilstein Gland nut which is loads less that the Saab originals which are a different design.
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Prepared them for blasting covering contact surfaces and bolt holes.
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The blasters I've used to date store up these little jobs then blast a few items in one session. This means you have to wait a week or so as they get pushed to back of the queue but it's cheap and a good result. Here they are bit of clean up by me too with more done when the hubs were removed.
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Next job press out the hubs. I bought this cheap press years back for a suspension rebuild on a daily driver. It's something I considered selling but then it's been used so much since. Can't store it at my small house but a good excuse to visit the folks. I got my Dad involved with this and it's a two man job holding it all while finding scrap bearings and metal that get the clearance needed. The first hub wasn't coming out without a fight and snagged on the last portion splitting the bearing instead. Went with a bang and bits everywhere, moving the bottle jack right over. Brown trouser moment for sure but all was well and the second went a lot smoother.
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Bearing pressed out with the aid of an old ford focus bearing shell and a hope bike hub press adaptor. Hording the old bits and bobs does pay off and cheaper than a proper bearing press set.
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Gone for FAG bearings and Febi hubs from Autodoc. So much fake SKF stuff out there these should be up to the job and from a reputable supplier.
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Pressing the bearings in was a bit of a rush so no picture. Just imagine me running from Freezer with bearing and my Dad holding everything lined up ready. I pressed them and they slid in with no drama and gently bottoming out on the pre-installed circlip. Speaking of which both circlips go with gap to bottom on both sides, got one side wrong and had to correct it after consulting Saab manual later, doh!
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Time to paint them up then press in the hubs although you will have to wait for finished pics as the weather is slowing drying time. Quite literally watching paint dry with rain stopping play outside lol.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2020 8:03 pm 
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I feel so satisfied reading this and its not even my car. Quality work.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2020 11:57 pm 
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Great work. It's so good to see an OG receiving this kind of love and attention.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:16 pm 
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Loving this thread. Top work!

Any updates, Speedy?


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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2020 9:46 pm 
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Thanks for the comments @WheelyBigCheese, @Doive and 7aero.

Time for a long overdue update. Thoughts with people affected by COVID and facing challenges just to survive in these crazy times. In the grand scheme of things this car project is not important, but in the interests of entertainment here's some project silver updates.

The hubs were treated to 2 coats of Corroless S Rust Treatment Killer Inhibiting Primer. I bought this from arc-rite this time as it's rumoured Buzzweld base their modified offerings on the Corroless paint. This makes sense as I preferred the old RCP but happy to give both companies a good recommendation. This primer from arc-rite was great just how I wanted it nice and easy to apply and flowed out nicely.

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Despite some meticulous prep one strut blistered just in one area on the second coat. Never had this before using this paint but must've contaminated the acid8 primer or surface metal when pressing in the bearings.

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I initially tried to fix just those small areas but then the other bits blistered which was frustrating. This of course had to occur in the most curved awkward bit to sand lol.

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That did the trick and back on track I went with 2 coats of Corroless RF16 Glass Leaf Impregnated Gloss Top Coat. Pressed in the hubs and installed the B8 shocks which was a two man job. Needed one person to hold the strut with all their weight on the bench while I torqued it up making sure the tool couldn't slip or jump out. I added some blue Loctite on the gland nut threads which might be controversial but I don't want those loosening ever and plaguing me with a hard to detect knocking sound.

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Saab call this next bit a lower spring spacer that turns to dust after 20 years. Had trouble getting my hands on a pair as they were on back order at the time. Place in France had some in stock so finally got my mitts on the missing piece needed to complete the struts.

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The edges were a little sharp on these so I smoothed them off and then decided to paint them. Should last longer now they've been acid8 primed and coated with two coats of Corroless RF16. The gloss makes it tricky to get a good picture but the finish is really good considering it won't ever be seen.

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Top mounts was next on the shopping list and their wasn't a clear favourite to choose from out there. The old proper Saab mounts were excellent build quality but turns out that stock was used up a few years back. Orio look to be supplying a proparts item and I asked for advice on a Facebook group called 'Saab Classic 9-3 & ng900 International OWNERS'. This group is excellent and came back with two favourites which were KYB and Poly mounts made by GS(TALIAFERRO). The poly ones were tempting but after some research concluded they are a standard mount with the little air gap top and bottom filled with poured polyurethane. They used to be made with the old stock proper Saab mounts but now an aftermarket mount and expensive to import to the UK. With that in mind I went for the KYB offerings and finally got to unbox the Eibach lowering springs.

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The goal was now to get the car into a rolling chassis which would need some new bushes in the stanchion arms. I looked at aftermarket replacements but could only find unbranded items for sale which didn't convince me of the alloy quality compared to original. Bought some Monroe replacement bushes for the originals and cracked on with removal.

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First job to clean them up with using Alubrite metal deoxidiser. This stuff is great but nasty chemical wise and makes your skin burn if you're unlucky enough to get splashed. I even use a face mask with it now, once bitten, twice shy lol.

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I tried to press out the old bushes but started approaching squeaky bum levels of pressure with no movement. Different tactic required and removed the inner bush with a drill and dremelled a groove in the remaining outer shell to weaken it.

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Attempt two on the hydraulic press and the remaining bush popped out easy. An oil seal installation kit had just the right sized metal to press on the outer edge of the new bushes. New bushes were stored in the freezer to aid installation and although the depth setting looked tricky there's one spot where the bush edge should be flush with the stanchion arms.

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Job done ready to install on the car. Really pleased to re-use those original arms and keep a bit of the old Saab quality in these parts.

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Next up was the subframe and antiroll bar which sneaked into the pictures earlier and showed a little bit of surface rust in places. The subframe is amazing, Saab really did us proud here galvanising this at the factory. Internally it's still mint with just a bit of external surface rust starting but it was an oily crusty mess.

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Now I might get some stick for this but I decided to coat it to protect it for many more years. The picture doesn't do it justice but if I told you the hours spent removing surface rust and oxidisation you would question my sanity. I also managed to coat anything within a 3 meter radius in a fine layer of dust!

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As it's galvanised Acid8 was the primer of choice.

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This showed I had missed some oxidisation especially in the spot weld depressions. Sanded areas missed and sprayed those with Acid8 again with the subframe now ready for topcoat.

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The anti roll bar clamps got deox-c treatment after sanding and then corroless primer. Kept the coats very thin where the bush seats to avoid any installation issues down the line.

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The front antiroll bar was next up for preparation but opened up a can of worms regarding sizes and options. The Saab EPC doesn't state which models came with the different sized bars. They are paint marked and my donor and SE both featured the yellow option which is Code A = 24mm and uses bush 4543518.

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The Facebook group 'Saab Classic 9-3 & ng900 International OWNERS' helped me out again with owners chipping in to confirm what their cars featured.
Code A = 24mm 4543492 bar marked yellow and uses bush 4543518.
Code B = 26mm 4543500 bar marked blue and uses bush 4543526.
Code G = 28mm 4905824 bar marked red and uses bush 4905832 (diesel models)
*don't treat the above as 100% correct there were some US/Canada anomalies.

The results were interesting the aero with sports suspension uses the blue code B bar. However aero convertibles used the yellow code A presumably due to the roof weight and having stiffer rear springs. The one I was interested in was the Viggen Coupe which has lower stiffer springs and turns out it uses the yellow code A bar. This was a result as it meant I could use the one from my donor car which was in much better condition.

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No laughing at the painting didn't want to add any paint thickness to the bush contact points. The ends received some prep and corroless primer treatment before the whole bar was sprayed with tough black paint.

The Corroless RF16 was really nice to brush paint. It flows out nicely so you don't see big brush strokes and I built up a few thin coats on the subframe and anti-roll bar mounts. Here it is ready to install on the car...

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Need to say a massive thanks to Bill & Leila at SAABits. I've been ordering a boat load of bits that must take some time processing and checking before sending out. That last order arrived the other day and should keep me busy for a while.

Will continue the updates tomorrow...


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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2020 11:18 pm 
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Saab Nut

Joined: Wed Jan 13, 2010 5:05 pm
Posts: 1876
Location: Wirral
Car Models: GM900
Incredible work as usual!

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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2020 12:08 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:02 pm
Posts: 32
Car Models: 9-3 OG
Thanks @WheelyBigCheese it's quite therapeutic doing this thread and reminding myself of the ups and downs. It's great to show friends too especially when I get a comment like "What you doing to that car still, taking it apart and cleaning it". lol.

The subframe got new antiroll bar bushes and new bolts for the stanchion and suspension arms. Speaking of which I've gone for these Meyle HD suspension arms.

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I'm not usually a fan of Meyle products but these get great reviews from other Saab owners. They do seem good quality and Meyle must be confident they will last to to offer a 4 year warranty on them. Now I hear you say "why aren't you going with powerflex bushes?". Well about 10 years back I had a ford focus and changed all the rear suspension bushes to powerflex. The car handled great but after a few months the dreaded squeaks started and used to annoy me massively. While I'm sure the silicone greases have got better I don't want to be taking suspension apart to grease things in a few years’ time. The bushes that move vertically also just rotate the bush around the metal pin unlike the rubber which is bonded to the pin and flexes. That very design is just hard to prevent squeaks although it does hold positioning better for alignment in corners. The Powerflew imo would be great for a track car but this will be a daily driver.

Next bit of the puzzle was the brakes and I decided to go for the Viggen 308mm option purchasing the aftermarket carriers from Neo Brothers. I also wanted the Viggen splash shields and got a bit excited seeing these still listed on the Orio website. However the bubble was burst when I was told they are on back order with no known date and some sites listing them as NLA. The hunt was on for an alternative but I kept my eye out for any genuine items which are like rocking horse poo to obtain (part number - 4567749). I managed to get my hands on one for reference and looked to the Vauxhall parts bin for anything similar. I wanted a close match and something with vents similar to the genuine. Certain Vauxhall Insignias come with 16" brakes and these are a great match and cheap.

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They are sided due to that bigger lower hole and part numbers 22877567 and 22877577.

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I cut the mount area from the old splash shield to use as a template.

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Used a ruler to follow the edge out so you can measure gap each end to ensure it's central.

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Bit of spray paint made the centre punch work easier and drilled the holes with a 6.5mm hole. Opened out central section with a dremel cutting and grinding bit.

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Mocked them up with the new carriers to check fitment.

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Obviously you can't beat the real genuine Saab ones in terms of quality but think these are a nice alternative and cheap too. Treated them to some Corroless RF16 paint to prevent them rusting up.

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Brake calipers were up next and the ones off the donor car were in really good condition. Because the corrosion looked quite light I went for the deox-c rust removal instead of blasting.

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They stayed in a bucket of water and deox-c for about 2 weeks. Every so often I would scrape off stubborn rust and brush over the surface.

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Once happy the rust is removed you have to wash them a few times in hot soapy water. However the deox does something odd to the surface and they will rapidly flash rust no matter how quick you dry them.

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You then have to wire brush and scotch them which brings them back to nice clean metal which won't flash rust.

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I have to confess it's much easier to take them to the blasters instead but time was on my side here.

They stay water tight which nicely cleans all the rusty piston area too. Popped those out to clean up the areas under them.
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Nice clean calipers ready for paint...
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Pistons cleaned up well and can be used again. You can get aftermarket replacement but these original ATE ones are excellent quality.
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The aftermarket 308mm carriers have casting marks which wanted smoothing off. Used the dremel grinding bits here which will help with paint coverage and make them look a bit better. Side by side comparison with the smoothed version on the right.
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You could go straight to VHT caliper paint at this stage but I wasn't ready for that and needed to preserve them. I've used Acid8 for calipers before and masked up the contact faces.
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I've used caliper spray in the past on rebuilds and it lasted about 12 months as it's hard to get full coverage in all the nooks and crannies. I then freshened up those calipers with some E-tech caliper paint applied by brush that's still doing well now. I can only assume the brush gives much better coverage which is doing a better job of preventing surface rust forming. With that in mind I went for this E-tech brush approach on the Saab...

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I've gone for black as it hides the brake dust and the car and wheels are silver. Granted doesn't look as good as a sprayed coating but confident it will last well with the 3 coats on there.

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This next bit might seem a bit mad but I want the hubs and disc end to still look good in a few years’ time. I've had great results in the past building up the paint in those areas from new and it lasted until the discs wore out. Pagid discs I've left with the factory paint have only lasted 1/2 years before looking a bit tired with surface rust starting. Last time I used Simoniz VHT paint which was meant for exhaust manifolds but this time the paint didn't seem as good. I wiped off spray from the wheel contact area as I applied the coats but Jury is out on this one and will see how it lasts. The caliper retaining springs cleaned up nicely and got painted while I was at it.

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You can still buy the proper ATE seal kits and guide sleeves which was a nice surprise. Treated them to some stainless bleed nipples and new hardware in places.
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Rebuild went well using red rubber grease for the caliper seals and silicone for slider pins. It turns out the brake lines are actually a proparts item and while I'm sure people have used these with no issues, I've since discovered I can still buy the ATE version. In a complete brand snob move I've ordered the ATE ones and loosely fitted the bolts to these for now.
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At this point I wanted to assemble the car as a rolling chassis and potentially stand it on it's own weight. That would need the outer cv joints in place to prevent any bearing damage. These will be getting replaced on my driveshafts so whipped off the old ones.

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Assembly went well I got everything in this post above installed then noticed a problem. When you hit the wheels side on with your hand you could hear a metallic rattle/buzzing noise. One side wasn't too bad but the drivers side was worse and I couldn't leave it. It had to be the splash shields so all the brake components had to come off again. Undoing the screws and re-tightening made it nearly disappear but still a slight buzzing when force is applied. Potentially this is caused by me brush painting the surfaces but I've used some 3m tape on the contact face that's typically used for brake squeal.

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This worked no more rattle/buzzing when bashing the strut or wheel from the side. The tape was a bit tricky and maybe overkill. Think a tiny smear of tigerseal would've done the same job and potentially a problem of my own making with the brush paint. Just mentioning it in case anyone copies my splash shield alternative and finds similar.

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Little bit of touch up paint needed on the calipers after that disassembly to fix the splash shield but the rolling chassis stage is nearly complete.

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I've started on the engine so will try and get another update done asap.


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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2020 6:51 am 
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Full Pressure Turbo

Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2013 12:10 am
Posts: 761
Location: West Berks
Car Models: XC70.....
Outstanding job there. Thanks for sharing.

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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2020 8:00 am 
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Saab Nut

Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2013 10:17 am
Posts: 1337
Car Models: .
Incredible work, Speedy. Might PM you for some parts / kit numbers if OK! Especially that ATE kit.

Keep it up! Really good thread.


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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2020 7:34 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:02 pm
Posts: 32
Car Models: 9-3 OG
Thanks @Eternal optimist and @7aero

Yeah sure @7aero happy to help out. I used the Saab part numbers for the rubber ATE bits.
4778262 Gasket set
4467064 Guide Sleeve Kit

I got them from autodoc which brings up all the brand options including ATE.

I get all the part numbers from the Saab EPC which I downloaded from here and you can filter on your car vin number: http://saabworld.net/showthread.php?t=33310

The stuff like mounting hardware comes from Orio and I use their web portal to get a rough guide price. Take the prices with a pinch of salt, usually stuff is bit more expensive or simply not available but I've used Bill at Saabits to then get the parts https://www.saabits.com/.


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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2020 7:48 pm 
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Saab Nut

Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2013 10:17 am
Posts: 1337
Car Models: .
Speedy uk wrote:
Thanks @Eternal optimist and @7aero

Yeah sure @7aero happy to help out. I used the Saab part numbers for the rubber ATE bits.
4778262 Gasket set
4467064 Guide Sleeve Kit

I got them from autodoc which brings up all the brand options including ATE.

I get all the part numbers from the Saab EPC which I downloaded from here and you can filter on your car vin number: http://saabworld.net/showthread.php?t=33310

The stuff like mounting hardware comes from Orio and I use their web portal to get a rough guide price. Take the prices with a pinch of salt, usually stuff is bit more expensive or simply not available but I've used Bill at Saabits to then get the parts https://www.saabits.com/.


Above and beyond 8)

Thanks Speedy!


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