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PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2020 9:15 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2005 9:03 pm
Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
Not looking forward to buying the next lot of antifreeze given this thing holds 19.5 litres of coolant! The system is also a pain to bleed apparently so I've that to look forward to!

Definitely need to look at tweaking the idle speed up a bit...450rpm is a little on the low side...book says 750.

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That might be a job for tomorrow.

Today's task was to see if we could restore sanity to the reversing lights. A quick search on Google revealed that the switch is on the gear selector assembly inside the car rather than outside...surprisingly sensible!

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It just screws into the side of the selector mechanism and there's no need to strip that down to remove it.

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It was very obviously gummed up, requiring the plunger to be manually pulled back out rather than snapping back out under spring pressure.

Turns out all it needed was a good clean and a dose of fresh lubricant. Ten minutes later everything was back together and the lights behaving as they should.

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Tiny little task in the grand scheme of things but nice to have it ticked off anyway.

Fuelled up again this morning...9.8MPG and £92!

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2020 11:55 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2005 9:03 pm
Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
Courtesy of an idiot in an Audi RS6 who decided that headlights are for loosers and that they're too important to give way to mere mortals on roundabouts I wound up with a bit of a cleanup operation to do. I wound up with most of the meal I had just picked up and two milkshakes on the floor.

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I had secured everything, but apparently not sufficiently to withstand full on evasive maneuveres.

On the plus side the main carpets in the Jag simply lift out. So getting those out wasn't a problem and they are now drying in my conservatory.

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The thing about mid brown carpets is that they can hide quite a bit of grime! While most of them weren't too bad (save for the not inconsiderable amount of milkshake!) the driver's side front one took quite a while to get clean water running off.

The carpeting on the sills however appears to be glued in place so cleaning that will require a bit more effort...seems like this might finally be the excuse I need to actually get around to picking up a wet vacuum cleaner. Would be useful to have around, not least because Autotrail felt it necessary to fit pale beige long pile carpet in the cab of the van...and it's filthy.

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 10:15 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2005 9:03 pm
Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
Still need to do something about the one sill (it's been sponged clean as far as I can manage so far) but the rest of the carpets were finally dry today and are now back in.

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Really need to get some leather dye on the steering wheel I think. As the rest of the interior is getting more tidy it's letting things down more!

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2020 12:17 am 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2005 9:03 pm
Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
Was tipping it down again this afternoon yet again.

Is the windscreen still leaking?

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That will be a yes then.

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2020 10:40 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2005 9:03 pm
Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
Today thanks to a friend I had the opportunity and honour to have a shot of something really rather special.

Not often you come across things which make the interior of the XJ-S seem Spartan and the seats seem conservatively padded!

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Those seats are actually even more comfortable than they look.

I love the contrast with the Biturbo between the interior which is absolutely thoroughbred Italian luxury supercar, the soundtrack which matches...and the utterly understated exterior.

Excuse the crudely blanked out registration plates, it's a friend's car so I'd rather keep them covered - and I don't have a decent photo editor on my phone.

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The rear in particular is very anonymous, and leaves people looking around trying to figure out where the howling V8 is hiding!

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There are a lot of little details though which bely how special a car she is. The door handles to name one.

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She is a very Italian car. Only they can make a car feel like such a real living, breathing creature rather than just a machine. Plus they tend to produce cars where there is a hilarious blend of luxury and downright shonky. Such as the wing mirrors which are utterly incapable of staying where you point them behind the first bump. Oh, or the warning lights on the dash...which are comprehensive to say the least.

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...However they may as well not be there as they are all entirely hidden behind the top of the steering wheel when driving. Oh, and that Italian thing where half the gauges don't sit at zero. The Lada carried that over from its Fiat routes too.

It's probably nearly 20 years since I wqs last in a Biturbo and I had honestly forgotten what gorgeous cars they are. This sort of uber-luxureous performance car has started to appeal to me more as I've got older...I used to gloss over cars like these as unnecessary and pointless...however the high velocity squidgy leather sofa category is really growing on me.

When (if) I decide it's time to move on from the Jag I think one of these will definitely be high on the list to take that position in the fleet. Especially as it comfortably seats four and doesn't require you to descend to several inches below bedrock to climb onboard...which are two areas where the Jag does lose points. Don't get me wrong though, I'm not in any way shape or form thinking of moving her on any time soon given how I've meshed so well with the car...this is purely a thought experiment for the hypothetical fleet.

Here's why I love this guy's garage so much though...having dropped that off, I was then able to jump into this.

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Which is in my view every bit as interesting a car in its own way and as much fun to drive. Especially being a first generation AX she has the interior with the comedy ergonomics.

I can't think of any other car where I have to reach *around* part of the dash itself to get to the power window switches...

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The AX/late Visa/C15 dash however is almost timeless though isn't it?

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I thought it was a messy design when I first came across it but it's really grown on me and it seems quite charming to me these days.

Do wonder how many other models this ended up in...the Talbot Samba and the Umm four wheel drive immediately spring to mind...

Later on in the day I decided to set about de-fluffing the van. I'll be using it actually to sleep in for a couple of days this coming week so really wanted to reduce the volume of dog hair in there!

I've been considering picking up a carpet cleaner or wet vacuum cleaner this week. The cab of the van I think makes a very good case for it.

Can you see where the mat sits?

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Nevertheless, the living area has been effectively de-fuzzed.

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Just need to give the water system a flush through so it's ready for use (as it had been drained down and blown through with compressed air to eliminate any freezing risk over the winter).

Will be a good opportunity to test out the heating system in the real world and I'm quite looking forward to testing it out.

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2020 6:37 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 3:05 pm
Posts: 1446
Location: Crewe, Cheshire
Car Model: 2002 Saab 9-5 Aero Estate
Is that a turbo Dyson or just NA :lol:

Nice interior there Zelandeth, it is certainly spacious looking and quite welcoming I'd say.

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'02' 9-5 Aero wagon
'98' 9-5 SE 2.3LPT
'98' 9000 CSE 2.0LPT
'01' 9-5 2.0L LPT
'97' Merc SL500 (oops)


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2020 1:32 am 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2005 9:03 pm
Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
Just an scruffy old DC24. It's an overcomplicated user-unfriendly, plasticky piece of rubbish. It's been relegated to van and garage after I finally lost patience with it when yet another clip broke and I bought a Henry for the house. So, so much less hassle to use! I keep the Dyson for this job mainly because of the powered beater brush making it take a quarter of the time to de-fuzz the carpets. It's held together by hope, cable ties and duct tape.

There has been one area that the van has struggled a bit ever since I got it: Audio.

Having upgraded the drivers in the cab they were just about passable - though the dash cutouts only allow for 10cm drivers so there's only so much that we can do there.

In the back though we had bigger problems with these.

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Again they're only 10cm drivers...but the issue here isn't the diameter (it wouldn't be hard to widen the cutout) it's the depth. The roof panel is only about an inch and a bit behind there so any serious upgrade is likely to involve a bigger enclosure that will stand proud of the ceiling.

Had a bit of an epiphany this afternoon though and realised that there's absolutely nothing to say that the speakers need to stay in the ceiling. There's plenty of other places they can go where depth isn't a problem.

Grabbed a 5x7" speaker I had laying around and went to have a look.

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Nearside one can go here, helpfully it can actually hide below the floor in the wardrobe I believe.

Offside is a little more awkward, but here looks to be the best spot.

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It backs onto the side of the oven, but the outer skin of it barely gets warm so I'm not too worried about that. If depth is an issue there I can probably get away with using a little spacer without it being too obvious.

A 6x9" should work just as well as this in these locations and give us a bit more punch.

Have a plan to get things a bit beefier in the cab too. What I reckon I'm going to try is getting a decent set of drivers installed down here forward facing behind the seats in the end of the lockers...

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The important thing though is that I'd keep a pair of tweeters in the place of the current cab speakers to help keep a decent soundstage in the cab. Bass is relatively non-directional, it's the treble you need to place carefully as that's what will give you the stereo separation.

It's either this or in the front of the box under the seats, but those boxes are full of battery and it involves cutting metalwork with I'd rather avoid.

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I'll keep the original speakers in the back of the van, but what I'll do is hook those into the TV as they're absolutely perfectly serviceable for that sort of duty...just not providing music above an OM.601 with a straight through exhaust being worked hard!

That's been a bit of a fly in the ointment ever since I got it as I do like my music, but I really didn't know quite what to do about it as the original speaker placements left little room for improvement. Quite why moving them didn't occur to me until now I've no idea. Well the obvious answer is that I'm an idiot I think!

It's a low priority thing really in the grand scheme of things but will impact a lot on my enjoyment of it, especially on longer runs.

A sub is something that might join the party one day...I know what a difference it can make, and unlike in a car it's not like I'm struggling for anywhere to fit one without eating half the boot or anything.

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2020 6:55 pm 
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Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
Not content with averaging 13MPG the Jag apparently decided this morning that merely using its fuel wasn't bankrupting me quick enough!

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Yep...it was caught dribbling fuel all over the floor.

I had fuelled up in the last hour, our drive slopes slightly downhill towards the camera and it's been quite nice and sunny here so far today.

As such I reckon things have expanded in the tank and it's forced fuel bank out the filler, probably due to a compromised tank vent line (which I've suspected for a while on account of a distinct pong of fuel in the boot). Though I've never noted and excessive pressure/vacuum in there really. It was weeping out around the cap seal itself then draining down the spill line in the filler surround today. Turning the car through 180 degrees so the filler was at the high rather than the low side sorted things.

Obviously only an issue when the tank is really full (so about 3 miles worth of driving then probably!) and on a warm day, but something I'll need to be aware of until I can investigate the venting system properly, and possibly renew the seal in the filler cap as it's a little perished in a couple of spots.

Have to wonder if this happened unknown to me at some point during the random sub-10MPG tank a couple of weeks ago...hard to say as the evidence is gone minutes later!

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2020 1:59 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:46 am
Posts: 5554
Location: suffolk
Car Model: 1993 9000 2.0 cse
dang youve been a busy beaver
surprised me how much coolant came out my jag xjs
but i was 21 then so knew sod all then apart from we need a bigger tub
your right that maserati could almost be a fiat and not a good looking one either
i like the later version of that maserati
theres a nice green one round here looks mint sounds ace and he drives it like your supposed to drive an italian

always good for a bit of comedy the passenger side choke had many a laugh with them back in the day
my bros still got an ax the smallest engine like you zantia colour but hardly any laquer left now 118k

everyone should have to drive a really low rent car for a while every year

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2020 11:39 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2005 9:03 pm
Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
Pretty sure we've got a developing issue with either the alternator or the regulator on the Jag. While the light goes out as normal when the engine starts, it doesn't seem to properly start charging until the engine is brought up to around 3000rpm and held there for a couple of seconds. Then the system seems to wake up and start charging properly. It will then stay there until the engine is next stopped. Before that point the system voltage will hover around 13V - so it is still generating power, just at a reduced level. Once the system "wakes up" it jumps up to a normal charging voltage.

Need to do some research on the likely cause and get the necessary things ordered in. At least alternators don't look to be massively expensive if a new one is needed. This one has been rebuilt - but that was back in 1998 so it's not really undue some attention.

I will obviously have a crawl under that corner (I *think* it's relatively accessible from underneath) and get myself covered in oil and clean up the connections to the alternator as it wouldn't be the first time I've fixed odd charging behaviour with naught but jiggling a connection.

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 2020 4:19 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2005 9:03 pm
Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
Yesterday evening I finally made a start on something that I've been meaning to do literally for months - trying to get the garage tidied into a vaguely user-friendly state.

Lately getting into the garage to access the chest freezer at the back has required me to physically climb over the nearside rear wing of the Invacar because of how cluttered the place was.

After three or four hours I managed to get to this stage.

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Which doesn't look like much, but at least means I can actually get in now!

Doesn't do anything to address this disaster area though.

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Basically the problem I have in here (aside from too much utter junk) is a chronic lack of storage or any space to go through some of the boxed things to figure out what's worth keeping and what is honestly just useless detritus which is fit only for the bin.

While in there yesterday evening though I did finally make a point of having a look around and coming up with a proper plan of attack.

Along both sides of the garage I will install a more or less full length shelf slightly above standing head height. Those will hold a lot of the consumables and light weight items that are used on a more or less daily basis in a way that's relatively easily accessible but doesn't impinge on the actual working area. The intention there is to leave the floor either side of the car completely free to allow me to shift it to the left or right a little to suit whatever I'm doing. As it stands even on the clear side there isn't enough room for me to sit comfortably to access anything, much less see what I'm doing. I've got a couple of old coat racks from some old wardrobes which will go on the wall to the offside of the Invacar which any spray bottles with triggers can be hooked onto. There's no need for them to take up shelf space when they can hang on the wall.

At the far end things will be completely reconfigured.

The far wall will be pretty much entirely given over to full width, full height shelving. Right up to the ceiling as there is going to be quite a bit of stuff in here that I only use now and then, so I don't mind having to grab the little stepladder now and then.

The Sun diagnostic machine will be positioned pretty much directly in front of where the Invacar is currently parked (the Crypton one has been sold and will be collected by its new owner shortly hopefully), between it and the wall (to the offside) I will hopefully then have room for a small workbench. Nothing huge, but at least somewhere I can finally fit a vice as not having access to one is really annoying. I've lost count over the last few years of how many times I've sliced, hammered, wire-wheeled, frozen, set fire to or sanded my fingers because I was holding onto the thing I was working on rather than having it firmly held in a vice.

Behind that I'm hoping to then have at least two ranks of free standing shelving running right to the wall on the right, just leaving room to the left for a comfortable access passage.

This should give me masses more storage than I've ever had access to before which should then hopefully be sufficient to allow me to get rid of all the piles of things on the ground and the disintegrating cardboard boxes. Once that's done hopefully it will give me enough room to actually go through a lot of the stuff that was brought down from Aberdeenshire in a hurry when I had to clear out my folk's house at short notice and decide what's to be kept, what's to be donated to the charity shops and what is honestly fit for nowhere other than the recycling centre.

All previous attempts to tidy this place up have just consisted of picking up the piles of stuff from one place, moving them somewhere else then putting them down again without actually achieving anything, so having an actual plan in mind to deal with it feels like progress.

I've a few things that I'd like to get stuck into over the next few years, but step one before I can even think about any of these has to be "get my stuff sorted out!" if things have any hope whatsoever of getting off the ground.

Not least a few of the jobs coming up on the Jag...They're going to be far more pleasant with access to a reasonable work area than doing it sitting cross legged on the driveway while being eaten alive by the ants which inevitably get everywhere here in the summer.

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 2020 11:01 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 2:17 pm
Posts: 385
Location: Kent
If you have a WorkMate and your vice isn't one of those huge ones, bolt it to one end of a length of 4 x 2 and just clamp that in the top of the WM. It can be very versatile, sometimes much better than being fixed to a bench.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 2020 11:35 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2005 9:03 pm
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Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
I wanted to confirm the garage dimensions so I could start planning out how much shelving I can fit in there. However I didn't want to go out in the rain for a fifth time to measure it. So I dug out the floor plan saved from the original property listing when we were looking at buying this place.

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It's an oddly long narrow space (the door is so narrow that to get the Lada in I had to fold both wing mirrors in). Granted, the whole layout of this house is a bit odd!

I'll have a play around with a few possible layouts in CAD tomorrow afternoon if I have time. I'd like to know roughly how much shelving I can actually fit in before I start buying things. Should allow me to figure out roughly how much square footage of storage I'll gain through the project too.

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2020 9:28 pm 
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Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
Not really been much going on the last few days. Finally did get the opportunity to give the Jag a wash to get rid of most of the caked on salt and grime.

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Still doesn't scrub up bad.

Really do need to attack the wheels with some solvent cleaner to try to get rid of the foam backing from previous balance weights.

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Had a trip out in my housemate's current company car today, an Audi TTRS. This has the fancy magnetoadaptive suspension so I was actually expecting it might be almost tolerable - though I *expect* it to be pretty hard edged as that's kinda why it exists. I was quite impressed with the ride in the S7 we had as a demo a year or so back.

However it's utterly horrendous. Our street is paved with lockblock rather than tarmac, it's not that rough though. You honestly can't read the instruments driving along there it's bouncing around so much. The road noise is absolutely deafening as well.

While I was washing the Jag I think I spotted one reason why!

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There is absolutely zero give in these tyres (235/30 ZR20s!)...and yes, they're run flats.

It's moderately quick, but the lack of give in the tyres and the suspension seem to conspire to limit that as despite hugely wide tyres and four wheel drive going anywhere near full throttle on anything less smooth than a snooker table just results in the traction control light blinking angrily at you. Likewise cornering always feels downright terrifying as it skips and bounces around so much. Sure it would go pretty rapidly around a track, but on real road surfaces not so much.

Meh...disappointing. Wasn't expecting a luxury car, but had hoped it might at least be a bit of fun. So continues the string of company cars which have been utter let downs. The only one in the last few years I found tolerable was the top spec Skoda Superb L&K. That actually managed to be almost comfortable for journeys of more than ten minutes.

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2020 7:35 am 
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Posts: 1446
Location: Crewe, Cheshire
Car Model: 2002 Saab 9-5 Aero Estate
Two things :

1. I really like the wheels on your jag, very distinctive

2. How did Jaguar manage to get the exhaust out of a 5.3 litre V12 through those two tiny tailpipes when most cars these days with much smaller engines appear to have two jumbo variety baked bean cans at the back end ?

Onwards and upwards with the garage cleanup, are you stuck at home now with plenty of time or are you an essential worker ??

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'02' 9-5 Aero wagon
'98' 9-5 SE 2.3LPT
'98' 9000 CSE 2.0LPT
'01' 9-5 2.0L LPT
'97' Merc SL500 (oops)


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2020 9:44 pm 
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Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
The starfish wheels are one of my favourite designs out there I reckon, especially on the XJ-S. These could do with a bit of TLC, but are generally pretty presentable.

As for the exhausts, I've no idea. Especially given it's a 5.3 litre V12 which revs (willingly!) to 6500rpm. You do have to wonder how it can breathe well with this system. Granted fitting a larger bore system is a bit of a headache on this car as there's so little space available anywhere. Especially up front where the exhaust is already alarmingly low hanging as it is.

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Decided to take advantage of the sunshine this afternoon to try to get something done without me having to leave my property. Garage clear out is now on hold as we obviously can't get any rubbish cleared out to the tip.

Today's target was the thoroughly blocked "atmospheric coolant catch tank" - seriously Jag, it's an expansion tank - on the Jag. I'd like to get rid of the bottle currently wedged between hoses in the nearside front of the engine bay.

Access is gained by removing five 10mm (I expected them to be imperial sized!) Bolts and pulling the wheel arch liner out.

First contact with the enemy.

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Immediately obvious is that the overflow bung has escaped the side of the tank.

The idea of this setup is that if this tank were to overflow any water or steam would exit via that metal pipe you can see to the left. However if the seal between the tank and that pipe is compromised (which it is basically from day one as they never fitted well) this will simply escape into the wing.

Made worse by them sticking a foam pad underneath it to hold onto the moisture for as long as possible!

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The tank originally would have been a friction fit between two brackets however these were missing so once I fed the pipe through from the engine bay it was just lifted out.

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This left behind a lot of crusty mess.

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Quite how much crud was apparent once it was swept out. Hey, there's the remains of the bracket that should have been holding the tank!

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The results of this were honestly predictable.

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On the plus side, the outer wing just bolts on so access should be fine to carry out a repair. I could be naughty and bolt the liner back in and pretend not to have seen it as the MOT tester would never know... I'd rather properly fix it though. Even bearing in mind that I'll need to chase it back a ways to find solid metal it shouldn't be the worst repair to do. Especially as it's out of sight so my horrible welding won't be visible.

I had a bit of a peer into the void using my phone camera and the inner will looks fine. Couple of bits of surface rust but nothing terrifying.

It looks like the tank itself was replaced in the early 90s judging from the date of 1991 on a sticker on it.

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Given the line was completely clogged I was surprised to find that it did have some water in...well...something vaguely resembling liquid which may at some point have been water anyway.

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This smelled precisely like you'd expect for 30 year old Barr's Stop Leak or K-Seal...lovely! Given that Jag used to recommend adding two bottles of the stuff at each coolant flush, not surprising to find this. There was about an inch of compacted mud at the bottom of the bottle under about 1/2 a pint of water.

Trying to clear the pipe took way longer than getting everything out. The culprit was unsurprisingly the narrowest point in the system, the coupler between the two pipes.

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That was choked solid end to end. I had to resort to drilling the gunk out of it as it had the consistency of concrete. Again, I reckon age old leak stop compounds are probably to blame. Removing the hoses (once I eventually managed to get the hose clips free) required them to be cut and then peeled off with a pair of pliers as they were utterly welded onto it.

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The whole lot is now soaking in the sink in the utility room, probably awaiting a run through the dishwasher tomorrow before being refitted.

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The bung on the overflow will probably be sealed to the body using Sikaflex to hopefully make it something resembling water tight. Hopefully the system will be less troublesome going forward given that cooling system sealant potions won't be going anywhere near the car.

I will need to figure out some means to secure it though as the bracketry has long since dissolved too.

Welding the wing up will need to wait a bit as I'll need a bunch of supplies first which I obviously can't get out for just now.

In summary: It's been said a thousand times before by pretty much every owner of an XJ-S ever...what a stupid design!

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 27, 2020 9:37 pm 
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Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
The bottle was left soaking overnight before getting thrown in the dishwasher on an intensive wash this morning.

Hasn't cleaned up badly actually given there was about an inch of solid mud in the bottom of it originally.

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Looks perfectly serviceable to me.

Has now been reassembled ready for refitting.

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I'll make sure both the hose inlet/outlets are sealed properly once it's back on the car. I'll be careful about the hose routing to make sure it doesn't get kinked as I know that's a common problem with this setup.

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2020 9:18 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 3:05 pm
Posts: 1446
Location: Crewe, Cheshire
Car Model: 2002 Saab 9-5 Aero Estate
Good for another 20 years I'd say, you are slowly but surely getting around to all those niggly little jobs that ultimately preserve the life of the car, good job !

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'02' 9-5 Aero wagon
'98' 9-5 SE 2.3LPT
'98' 9000 CSE 2.0LPT
'01' 9-5 2.0L LPT
'97' Merc SL500 (oops)


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2020 10:30 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2005 9:03 pm
Posts: 1903
Location: Milton Keynes
Car Model: 96 Citroen Xantia Activa 2.0T
I've got a parcel on the way (the factors say it's business as usual for web orders so hopefully should be here soon) which contains:

[] Full coolant hose set. Thanks to the ridiculous expansion tank hose having been blocked for goodness only know how many years, the system has been over pressurising and at least two of the hoses are showing signs of distress as a result. See below.

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These both have cable ties wrapped around them to act as reinforcement until the new hoses arrive. At least the system pressure is being kept at sensible levels now.

Given they're all 34 years old, I figure they've done their time and are probably due a change. The radiator was replaced only a couple of months before I got the car, so having the hoses all replaced as well should hopefully mean I don't need to actively worry about the cooling system for a while.

I'm sure I will invent several new and exciting curses while trying to fit them.

[] Set of spark plugs.

[] A/C Compressor to condenser hose. Speaking of factory bodges - using jubilee clips to hold together the hot gas lines on the A/C system qualifies I think! It probably worked fine if the system was to be gassed up every year or two, but with the price of refrigerant these days (the system has been converted to r134a at least) I'd rather get shot of two joints which I know will leak...I've spent many hours helping out a friend who is a HVAC technician, so this makes my teeth itch!

Image

That's exactly the sort of bodge we used to find on equipment on the farm. Bonus points if it's on the high pressure side of a hydraulic system.

[] Cam cover gaskets for both cylinder banks and a set of half moon seals for the cam boxes.

[] Inlet manifold gasket set.

Both cam covers leak like a proverbial sieve at the moment...actually changing those is pretty simple...once you get to them! Um...

Can't even see the one on this side...

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Nearside one you can see bits of at least!

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Which also does a good job of highlighting how ridiculously long the engine is given that the cam cover runs from the oil filler (mid way between the radiator caps) all the way back to just above the windscreen washer bottle. She's a substantial old beastie! Pretty sure I recall seeing someone quoting a figure somewhere around the 450kg mark for the drivetrain in this thing...The unladen weight of the Invacar is 410kg!

Yeah, getting at the cam covers requires removal of the inlet manifolds (which of course requires removal or disconnection of no small number of things which are attached to or in the way of them). Well it's a good opportunity to change the gaskets I guess!

The distributor also needs servicing...which will be massively easier with all the nonsense it's normally buried behind out of the way. So doing this while I've already got things apart to do the cam cover gaskets makes a lot of sense to me. I'd rather not take this much stuff apart more often than I need to. Spark plugs will also be changed at the same time as getting to those requires you to unbolt the A/C compressor and to remove the assembly holding on the throttle linkage and ignition coil. This is a job that's way more awkward on the HE cars because of the angle the plugs screw into the heads. The plugs on the pre-HE cars just screwed straight down into the heads which made things way easier.

Hoping once the plugs are done, distributor has been overhauled and a new cap and rotor arm are on it that we'll finally be able to get an idle that's as silky smooth as it should be. Currently there's a very slight intermittent miss at idle which is really bugging me.

I wouldn't complain if it improved economy a bit either!

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96 Xantia Activa, 90 Merc 208D, 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE, 85 Sinclair C5, 73 AC Model 70


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:03 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 3:05 pm
Posts: 1446
Location: Crewe, Cheshire
Car Model: 2002 Saab 9-5 Aero Estate
That's quite a list of planned proactive maintenance Zealandeth, I know from recent activity on my 9000 that even a long list can get bigger and more complex due to the amount of stuff that needs to be removed for access, most of which entails undoing rusty bolts and fragile clips.

I started off with just an exhaust system replacement but that soon expanded to having to change the turbo, a/c condenser and dryer and several bolts as I found problems during the strip down, the good side is that you are unlikely to have problems with said items for some years ongoing.

Good luck :D

_________________
'02' 9-5 Aero wagon
'98' 9-5 SE 2.3LPT
'98' 9000 CSE 2.0LPT
'01' 9-5 2.0L LPT
'97' Merc SL500 (oops)


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