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PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2008 12:20 pm 
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Saab Nut
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Location: Looking forwards....
Car Model: 9000 Aero M97
Brilliant write-up, very clear.
Ditto Ylee about the guides- they just make something I regarded with fear seem quite managable.

Nice one JG.




Rohan :)

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2008 12:27 pm 
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Location: not in a SAAB.
Car Model: One of the first RHD 9-5s
Andy,

As I am going to have to take the Aero off the road for a while in order to sort the Exhaust Manifold out can I 'borrow' the bits required for stud extraction. I dont have any snapped studs yet but if I dont have all the stuff ready and available I know I will end up snapping one!

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2008 12:37 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2006 11:46 pm
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Location: Southampton, UK
Car Model: 9000CS+ Stage 3 ECU T7, 1.5bar
Tools cost me £20 to have made up out of Silver Steel.

9000Parts you have a PM, well you will when I finish writing this.

Thanks guys for the kind comments, but if it had not been for Rob explaining how he did his I would not have came up with the idea, so Thanks ROB

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2008 5:14 pm 
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Location: Whitley Bay
Car Model: 96, C900, 9k, 9-3 & 9-5
Glad it worked well, Andy.

The key here, as with most things, is to take care and prepare - as well as using the best equipment you can afford. As you have shown, it pays off.

Perhaps the three years of engineering I did at uni wasn't a complete waste of time! :lol:

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 11:28 am 
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Location: Whitley Bay
Car Model: 96, C900, 9k, 9-3 & 9-5
Just a reminder, if you are disconnecting any of the pipes to the turbo and drilling, seal up the open ports to the turbo (gaffa tape does the trick) to stop any swarf getting in.

I'm sure Andy did this.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 8:47 pm 
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Posts: 9438
Location: 'Ull
Car Model: 95 Aero Auto Est Stg 1 Noobed
do any of the engineering whizz kidz do a rental service on the jigs? could be quite profitable with 2 or 3 on the go at any one time. I'd pay a ver (plus postage each way) through paypal for the rental to do mine.

Think about it, 5(£) x 3(jig kits) x 1.5(rentals per kit per week) (maybe wishfull thinking on turnaround) x 52 weeks = £1,170 per year. £60 outlay looks good doesn't it?

Think about it, and let me know?

If not, I would accept a freebie loan of them :lol:

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:51 pm 
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When it's all fixed you might think about replacing them with some stainless studs and nuts so it won't happen again. I've got the GS set on mine but you have to keep an eye on them as they tend to work loose over time.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 3:01 pm 
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Location: East Herts
Car Model: 2007 9-3 1.9TiD Sport Wagon
Trackside wrote:
When it's all fixed you might think about replacing them with some stainless studs and nuts so it won't happen again. I've got the GS set on mine but you have to keep an eye on them as they tend to work loose over time.


In the good old days, when I were a lad :wink:, exhaust studs were invariably high tensile steel and the corresponding nuts were brass but about twice as long as a steel nut, no corrosion problems there and if anything did seize, the nut stripped it's thread before the stud would break so easy to rectify.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 06, 2008 10:27 am 
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Couple of things to note

a) be carefull about the way you insert a drill bit into the chuck. The shank is heat treated so that it is tougher rather than harder as in the cutting end, so avoid gripping too close to the flutes.

b) Be very carefull using stainless steel studs, bolts or nuts. A lot of the stainless fastners available will shear with very little provocation. Buy these from a reputable fastner supplier and tell them what it is you want to do with them.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 4:32 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2008 8:00 am
Posts: 39
Location: Not in UK
Car Model: Saab 9-3 01' Aero 5dr
Am I correct with the drawing for the jig?
EDIT.[been told I am]


Attachments:
jig.JPG
jig.JPG [ 56.99 KiB | Viewed 6722 times ]
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2010 1:51 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:24 pm
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Location: coventry (i was sent here),,,west midlands.
Car Model: 1994 gm900se stage1
when i took the head off my aero i found 3 broken stud that some muppet had just superglued back inplace,,,so they just fell out soon as i touched them with a spanner!!! so they gooed aload of god knows what sealer on the manifiold face to stop it blowing.

proper bodge job,,,sorted now tho :)


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 31, 2010 7:08 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 9:46 am
Posts: 192
Location: Welsh Marches
Car Model: 900 Carlsson
I may have this job to do soon since my exhaust manifold gasket is blowing on my 9000 Aero.

There have been 2 suggestions for alternative materials for the studs and their nuts in the posts above.

What is the consensus? Stainless steel studs and nuts, or high tensile steel studs and brass nuts?

Since these will not be Saab parts, what size are the studs (length, thread size, etc.)?

I intend to equip myself completely before starting anything!


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 5:20 pm 
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Location: Lurking ........ in the Paradise that is Bournemouth
Car Model: SAABs var.
9000 MY96 2.3CSE auto

Johno
We followed your technique for extracting broken manifold studs, and it works 100%.

Last weekend in the rain, we removed the exhaust manifold, turbo, downpipe, radiator fan, removed the wheel liner, slackened the serpentine belt (with our home brew tool) and shifted the air conditioning compressor.
We found not just one broken stud, but three.

Onto Ebay for the kit: Right angle drill attachment, a couple of 3mm cobalt drills, a couple of 5mm cobalt frills, a couple of 3/8 drive T20 and the cheapest Eazyout set I could find (sorry Robert).
Total cost for the lot £18.

JG (Andy) had made a special tool/guide for the drill bit, but its been lost. We duffed one up from a bit of spare aluminium tube, this was to act as a guide for the drill bit. The 'tool' that we used was a cut length from an aluminium D style door handle. It was about the right diameter and came with a threaded hole of about the right diameter, we cut a length of about an inch and a quarter.
It only acts as a guide to the drill and protection for the thread in the head. Being aluminium, any slight diversion showed immediately in the form of silver swarf. It worked a treat.

The first attempt was done very cautiously, with much attention paid to the correct angle and gentle drilling with loads of WD40 as a lubricant. When we were happy with the result, I knocked in the T20 bit, attached the handle, gave a quarter turn to the right and felt the stud move then out it came, smooth as silk. The next two were done the same way, carefully and with the same result.
Its only necessary to drill into the broken stud by a few mm, just enough to allow the T20 to bite.

Johno, thanks for the technique, and for anybody else who is faced with this job dont be afraid. I am a mechanical muppet and if I can do it you can do it too.

Regards Logan

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2011 9:00 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 16, 2004 2:44 pm
Posts: 331
Location: Bristol, England
Hi Logan,

I have to do this on my C900 so can you clarify one thing for me? What is the T20 for? From your description it seems like you used it as an easy out but you also mentioned you bought an easy out from ebay.
I'm easily confused. :oops:

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2011 9:55 pm 
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Location: Lurking ........ in the Paradise that is Bournemouth
Car Model: SAABs var.
The Torx T20 is a perfect fit for the 3mm hole that you drill. The splines have just enough grip. So drill into the centre of the broken stud to a depth of 3 or 4mm maybe a little more and tap the torx into the hole so that it grips, attach the ratchet and give a little turn to the right, to check that the stud is moving, then reverse the ratchet and take the stud out. The eezy out set was bought just in case plan A failed and we had to do it the hard way.
Regards Logan

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2011 10:06 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 16, 2004 2:44 pm
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Location: Bristol, England
LoganSaab wrote:
The Torx T20 is a perfect fit for the 3mm hole that you drill. The splines have just enough grip. So drill into the centre of the broken stud to a depth of 3 or 4mm maybe a little more and tap the torx into the hole so that it grips, attach the ratchet and give a little turn to the right, to check that the stud is moving, then reverse the ratchet and take the stud out. The eezy out set was bought just in case plan A failed and we had to do it the hard way.
Regards Logan

Cheers mate that has cleared it up for me.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 6:57 pm 
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Posts: 1
Car Model: SAAB 9.5 2.0 t SE ECO
Hi Guys,
I'm new here, found this forum while I was searching for broken exhaust stud removal.
Thank you, yahhi! My jigs are ready to use!!!
http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showt ... ost2183535


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 6:45 am 
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Location: Lurking ........ in the Paradise that is Bournemouth
Car Model: SAABs var.
zoli wrote:
Hi Guys,
I'm new here, found this forum while I was searching for broken exhaust stud removal.
Thank you, yahhi! My jigs are ready to use!!!
http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showt ... ost2183535

Hi Zoli, Welcome.
It was Johno who introduced this method of stud removal.
I suspect its use has saved shed loads of cash and a few cars.
Being a SAAB owner there are other forums that you can visit, but in my humble view this the best :D
Logan

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 7:33 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 14, 2012 3:49 pm
Posts: 274
Location: Cornwall
Car Model: SAAB 900 S soft top
I read with interest how some of you guys have managed to drill/easy out/however get a broken exhaust manifold bolt out. Now I guess this was done with the exhaust manifold in situ ie head remaining on the engine. Impressive? I don't know but what I do know is that to do this on a Classic 900 turbo soft top then to me that would be impressive.
My classic 900 turbo soft top has three of the seven exhaust manifold bolts buggered. A mate has managed to remove the manifold put a new gasket in situ and replace the manifold in such a way that it seems almost perfect well its certainly better than was.
So the question has anyone ever replaced any of the manifold studs on a Classic 900 turbo soft top with the head still on the engine?
If yes how was it done?
Or is it head off and drill out?
Fred

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 5:55 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2012 8:30 pm
Posts: 34
Car Model: saab 900 carlsson
LoganSaab wrote:
9000 MY96 2.3CSE auto

Johno
We followed your technique for extracting broken manifold studs, and it works 100%.

Last weekend in the rain, we removed the exhaust manifold, turbo, downpipe, radiator fan, removed the wheel liner, slackened the serpentine belt (with our home brew tool) and shifted the air conditioning compressor.
We found not just one broken stud, but three.

Onto Ebay for the kit: Right angle drill attachment, a couple of 3mm cobalt drills, a couple of 5mm cobalt frills, a couple of 3/8 drive T20 and the cheapest Eazyout set I could find (sorry Robert).
Total cost for the lot £18.

JG (Andy) had made a special tool/guide for the drill bit, but its been lost. We duffed one up from a bit of spare aluminium tube, this was to act as a guide for the drill bit. The 'tool' that we used was a cut length from an aluminium D style door handle. It was about the right diameter and came with a threaded hole of about the right diameter, we cut a length of about an inch and a quarter.
It only acts as a guide to the drill and protection for the thread in the head. Being aluminium, any slight diversion showed immediately in the form of silver swarf. It worked a treat.

The first attempt was done very cautiously, with much attention paid to the correct angle and gentle drilling with loads of WD40 as a lubricant. When we were happy with the result, I knocked in the T20 bit, attached the handle, gave a quarter turn to the right and felt the stud move then out it came, smooth as silk. The next two were done the same way, carefully and with the same result.
Its only necessary to drill into the broken stud by a few mm, just enough to allow the T20 to bite.

Johno, thanks for the technique, and for anybody else who is faced with this job dont be afraid. I am a mechanical muppet and if I can do it you can do it too.

Regards Logan


Thanks for the info Logan.
I'm attempting the same thing on my 900 Carlsson but finding it difficult to get the cobalt drill bit to bite into the stud.Would you reccommend a slow or fast drill speed for this?
I have used a centre punch mark to guide the drill bit but drilling upwards and at 45 degress is proving difficult even with the 45 degree attachment.
Any advice much appreciated.
Steve


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